Slough, Windsor and Maidenhead residents in court – June 2022

DARREN SINGLETON, 54, of Holyport Road, Maidenhead, admitted breaching a domestic violence protection order in Maidenhead on May 18, 2022. Committed to prison for seven days. 
TEMBA MUKIWA, 45, of Mill Street, Slough, admitted being drunk in a public place, namely Bath Road, Slough, which they were prohibited from doing by a criminal behaviour order. Community order made. Requirement to take part in up to 40 days of rehabilitation activities. Must pay £180 in court fees. 

May 26

CHRISTIAN RATKA, 32, of Penn Road, Slough, admitted drink driving on Farnham Road, Slough, on November 11, 2020. Caught with 94 micrograms of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath, the limit being 35mcg per 100ml. Community order made. Requirement to carry out 80 hours of unpaid work. Must pay £715 in court fees. Banned from driving for 40 months 
TETYANA PEKH, 37, of Beverley Gardens, Maidenhead, admitted driving without insurance on Bath Road, Maidenhead, on September 9, 2021. Fined £230 and must pay £139 in court fees. Given six points on their driving licence. 

May 27

MARY MCDONAGH, 55, of Skydmore Path, Slough, admitted two counts of theft from a shop, namely stealing £101.68 worth of meat from Marks and Spencer in Bracknell on December 12, 2020, and meat, clothing and cosmetics worth £541 from Marks and Spencer in Bracknell on December 8, 2020. Fined £160 and made to pay a £34 victim surcharge. 
RUSSELL MEADOWS, 47, of Yew Tree Road, Slough, convicted of assault and assault of an emergency worker in Slough on April 4, 2020. Community order made. Requirement to take part in up to 30 days of rehabilitation activities. Must pay a £95 victim surcharge. 
MICHAEL WARREN, 44, of Gorse Meade, Slough, admitted failing to identify a driver of a vehicle suspected of committing an offence in Banbury on September 1, 2021. Fined £514 and made to pay £136 in court fees. Given six points on driving licence. 
 

 

A fundamental principle of justice is that it must be seen to be done. Open justice is acclaimed on a number of grounds: as a safeguard against judicial error, to assist the deterrent function of criminal trials and to permit the revelation of matters of interest.

Slough Observer | News