In court from Berkshire, Reading, Slough, Bracknell – May 2022

CAMERON GRUBER, 18, of Mason Street, Reading, admitted possession of a knife, namely a folding pocket knife, and possession of cannabis, a Class B drug, in Reading on March 3, 2022. Conditional discharge for 24 months. Knife and cannabis forfeited and destroyed by police. Orderd to pay a £17 victim surcharge and £85 in court costs. 
KANE EATON, 29, of Reeve Road, Maidenhead, admitted failing to comply with supervision requirements following release from a period of imprisonment. Failed to attend appointments on three occasions in April 2022. Fined £50 and made to pay costs of £60. 
MATTHEW WILKIE, 44, of Liscombe, Bracknell, admitted failing to stop a vehicle when required by a police constable, taking a motor vehicle without consent, driving without a licence, driving without insurance, and causing unnecessary suffering to an animal, namely punching a police dog in the head, on February 27, 2022. Community order made. Requirement to take part in up to 20 days of rehabilitation activities. Banned from driving for six months. Ordered to pay court costs of £300 and a £95 victim surcharge. 

May 5

WAYNE DUHANEY, 47, of Parsons Road, Langley, admitted failing to comply with supervision requirements following release from a period of imprisonment. Failed to attend appointments on three occasions in February 2022. Fined £80 and made to pay £75 in court costs. 
NATHANIEL JEFFREY, 28, of Pentland Road, Slough, convicted of assaulting a man in Slough on July 12, 2021. Committed to prison for 12 weeks as the offence was committed during the operational period of a suspended sentence. Ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £128. 
ASIYE SULEYMAN, 51, of Raven Drive, Maidenhead, admitted driving without due care and attention and failing to comply with traffic signals installed at Maidenhead train station, Maidenhead, on October 4, 2021. Fined £120, made to pay a £34 victim surcharge and ordered to pay £85 in court costs. Given six points on driving licence. 
 

A fundamental principle of justice is that it must be seen to be done. Open justice is acclaimed on a number of grounds: as a safeguard against judicial error, to assist the deterrent function of criminal trials and to permit the revelation of matters of interest.

 

Slough Observer | News